First Metropolitan areas Summit requires integrated method of urban infrastructure

While Member States were adopting an answer on sustainable infrastructure in the United nations Atmosphere Set up, the Metropolitan areas Summit reinforced the significance of local action and the requirement for a built-in method of urban infrastructure.

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Urban infrastructure – meaning of Urban infrastructure through the Free Dictionary

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n.
1. A fundamental base or foundation especially for a corporation or system.
2. The fundamental facilities, services, and installations required for the functioning of the community or society, for example transportation and communications systems, water and utility lines, and public institutions including schools, publish offices, and prisons.

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C40 Blog

By James Alexander (C40 Metropolitan areas) and Darius Nassiry

We all know that metropolitan areas are answer to a eco-friendly and resilient future – however, many metropolitan areas all over the world are presently not able to invest in the bold and ambitious climate action which will stop us on course. Considerably more purchase of metropolitan areas is required, but if existing development banking companies, funds and investors offered more support, metropolitan areas – specifically in low- and middle-earnings countries – would still face a constant fight to invest in the transition to some low-carbon future.

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Capturing the Value of Public Land for Urban Infrastructure : Centrally Controlled Landholdings

Government entities in India hold large amounts of public land. Their landholdings include some of the most valuable property in the country. Parts of this patrimony lie vacant or underutilized. Public sector bodies also own large blocs of land that sometimes stand in the way of efficient completion of urban infrastructure networks. At the same time, urban India is deficient in basic infrastructure — both network infrastructure needed to support economic growth and urban service infrastructure needed to meet basic household needs like water supply, waste removal, and transportation. This condition raises fundamental questions. Are some of government landholdings “surplus” or not needed for service provision? If so, can their economic value be captured to help finance infrastructure investment? This report aims to document evolving government policies toward pubic land management. It examines how active public entities are in identifying “surplus” lands and attempting to monetize them. Public bodies in India have proved reluctant to surrender landholdings. The report therefore considers practical alternatives that have emerged, such as land trading among public institutions. Land exchange can clear the way for completion of important urban infrastructure projects, without requiring public landowners to declare their property “surplus” and suitable for market disposition.

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Transitioning Urban Infrastructure | PCGS | USF

 

Figure 1: Urban Water Management Transitioning [Source: Brown et. al., 2008]

The need for transitioning of Urban Infrastructure Systems (UIS) is illustrated by the facts that the earth system is undergoing significant rapid changes which have developed from increased human activities, population growth and urbanization (Vairavamoorthy et al., 2008). Whereas 48% of the world’s population presently live in cities and towns, this proportion is expected to increase to about 60% in the year 2030 aggravating the need for the transition of existing systems. Further more in developing countries the urban population is predicted to grow from 1.9 billion in 2000 to 3.9 billion in 2030, averaging 2.3% per year. In addition in developed countries, the urban population is expected to increase, from 0.9 billion in 2000 to 1 billion in 2030 with an overall growth rate of 1%. On the other hand, existing infrastructure systems have been gradually deteriorating due to environmental action and ageing; in many cases significantly exceeding their design life leading to failure to meet the minimum level of service. Continue reading “Transitioning Urban Infrastructure | PCGS | USF”

The Urban Infrastructure

Nicholas Papayanis and Rosemary Wakeman

The urban infrastructure is analogous to the internal frame of a building: as the frame is the underlying structural support for the building, the urban infrastructure is the underlying structural foundation of a city. Cities from the earliest times have had infrastructural amenities—roadways and sewers, for example—and all infrastructural development involves the provision of public services and the use of public spaces that are deemed essential for the ability of people to live in the city. Over time an increasingly accepted notion was that circulation of air, sunlight, commerce, vehicles, water, waste matter, people, and even knowledge was as essential to the healthy operation of the city as, to employ another analogy, blood circulating through the human body. What marks the development of the modern infrastructure since the nineteenth century is its close association with technological development, industrialization, and the dramatic growth of city populations. While definitions of the urban infrastructure may include any and all public services, the essential elements of the urban infrastructure during the nineteenth century, the formative period of the modern city, consist of new streets and boulevards, mass transit, new sewage systems, and the provision of gas, water, and electricity. The net effect of these infrastructural developments is the creation of the modern city as a circulatory system designed to move people and material products rapidly and efficiently, both above- and belowground.
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